Introduction

CBSE NCERT Notes for Class 10 English (Poem) Chapter 4 – How to Tell Wild Animals

Chapter 4 of the CBSE Class 10 English First Flight book includes two poems. Carolyn Wells’s first poem is titled “How to Tell Wild Animals.” We will offer the summary and notes for CBSE Class 10 English First Flight Poem – How to Tell Wild Animals in this section. Students may utilise the how to tell wild animals summary and explanations to help them better comprehend the poetry while they study for the board test. These English notes for class 10 will also assist pupils with last-minute revision and save them time during the test.

CBSE Class 10 English notes will assist students in studying the topic thoroughly and clearly.

These CBSE Class 10 English notes were written by subject experts who made the study material very basic, both in terms of language and format.

STANZA 1

If ever you should go by chance,

To jungles in the east;

And if there should to you advance

A large and tawny beast,

If he roars at you as you’re dyin’

You’ll know it is the Asian Lion ….

EXPLANATION

The poet describes the characteristics of wild animals and explains how they can be identified in a forest by anyone.

The poet states in these lines that if one travels to the East’s jungles, one will encounter a large animal with brownish-yellow skin.

If he roars at you with such force that you fear death, you have encountered an Asiatic Lion.

STANZA 2

 

Or if sometime when roaming round,

A noble wild beast greets you,

With black stripes on a yellow ground,

Just notice if he eats you.

This simple rule may help you learn

The Bengal Tiger to discern.

EXPLANATION

The poet states in these lines that while rooming in the forest, one may come across a large wild animal.

This wild and noble creature’s yellow body is striped with black. If he attacks and consumes you, you can determine that this is a Bengal Tiger.

STANZA 3

 

If strolling forth, a beast you view,

Whose hide with spots is peppered,

As soon as he has lept on you,

You’ll know it is the Leopard.

‘Twill do no good to roar with pain,

He’ll only lep and lep again.

EXPLANATION

The poet describes in these lines how if you walk slowly or freely through the forest, you will come across a wild animal whose skin is covered in dark spots. As soon as it leaps on you, you’ll realise it’s the leopard.

Even if you scream in pain, there is no way out because the leopard will continue to jump on you.

STANZA 4

 

If when you’re walking round your yard

You meet a creature there,

Who hugs you very, very hard,

Be sure it is a Bear.

If you have any doubts, I guess

He’ll give you just one more caress.

EXPLANATION

The poet states in these lines that while walking around in your yard, you may come across a creature.

If he hugs you tightly, you can be certain that you are being hugged by a bear. If you have any doubts, the bear will hug you even tighter.

This hug may appear to be friendly, but it has the potential to be fatal (causing death). The bear will embrace you until you perish.

STANZA 5

 

Though to distinguish beasts of prey

A novice might nonplus,

The Crocodile you always may

Tell from the Hyena thus:

Hyenas come with merry smiles;

But if they weep they’re Crocodiles.

EXPLANATION

The poet expresses in these lines how difficult it is for an inexperienced person to distinguish (recognise) wild animals.

He may be unable to tell the difference between a Hyena and a crocodile. A hyena acts strangely (strangely), as it is constantly laughing while attacking its victim.

On the other hand, a crocodile weeps as it consumes its prey. The poet here warns readers not to wait for a hyena to laugh or a crocodile to weep before acting.

Both of these animals are dangerous, and individuals should take precautions to ensure their safety and security.

STANZA 6

 

The true Chameleon is small,

A lizard sort of thing;

He hasn’t any ears at all,

And not a single wing.

If there is nothing on the tree,

Tis the Chameleon you see.

EXPLANATION

The poet expresses in these lines how difficult it is for an inexperienced person to distinguish (recognise) wild animals.

He may be unable to tell the difference between a Hyena and a crocodile. A hyena acts strangely (strangely), as it is constantly laughing while attacking its victim.

On the other hand, a crocodile weeps as it consumes its prey. The poet here warns readers not to wait for a hyena to laugh or a crocodile to weep before acting.

Both of these animals are dangerous, and individuals should take precautions to ensure their safety and security.

Central Idea of the Poem 

 

This humorous poem illustrates several dangerous methods for identifying wild animals.

The poet humorously describes a variety of ferocious and fearful animals, including an Asiatic Lion, a Bengal tiger, a leopard, a bear, a hyena, a crocodile, and a chameleon.

Apart from being entertaining, the poem also contains information. It uses gentle humour to describe some of the unique characteristics of various animals.

Outro

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